Local company donates camera system to Memorial Hospital NICU

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6TH 2016

Local company Kem Krest is pitching in to help parents of babies in intensive care.

The Elkhart company donated money for specialized cameras in Memorial Hospital's NICU.

These cameras are a big deal to families. Parents and nurses faces light up when they talk about the Angel Eye system that's now up-and-running.

WSBT got to see the cameras in action.

4-month-old baby Rose has been at Memorial's NICU since she was born.

While mom Christina Lenzo is never too far away, she can't be here all the time.

Lenzo says, "Right before I went to bed I turned it on and just looked at her, made sure she was okay and it just made me feel very comfortable and calm."

She can do that, thanks to the Angel Eye Cameras.

"I'm here a lot, but my husband can't be. He works all day and it's really nice for him to check in on her and just see how she's doing while he's at work," says Lenzo.

The cameras are useful for people who need to go back to work or who have other young children at home to care for. Relatives who live far away can also log in to see a live video.

Memorial NICU's Nursing Director Diane Freel says, "It gives parents peace of mind. It is a great opportunity for them to see their babies when they physically cannot be here."

The system is very secure. Parents log on with a password they decide.

"I already put my password in, saved it," says Lenzo. "So all I have to do is sign in – it goes right to the camera. I hit play and there she is!"

There is no cost for parents to use the technology.

Kem Krest in Elkhart donated over $15,000 for the 5 cameras last year.

"We all kind of felt like it was going to give the biggest impact, says Kem Krest Supply Chain Analyst Kaley Hutsell. "It was going to impact just a number of families throughout the year."

Employees at Kem Krest say they wanted to make this donation because many understand what it's like to have a child in the NICU.

Meggan Fink, of Kem Krest Corportate Marketing adds, "It's also just something that's not going away. There's always going to be children in the NICU, so it's something that will be a lasting impact."

It's an impact that has made a mark on the Lenzo family. While Rose won't remember these first few months, her mom certainly will.

http://wsbt.com/news/health/local-company-donates-camera-system-to-memorial-hospital-nicu