Driscoll Children's Hospital uses Angel Eye Cameras to help parents bond with their babies

Driscoll Children's Hospital uses Angel Eye Cameras to help parents bond with their babies

Driscoll Children's Hospital cares for hundreds of babies in the hospital's Neonatal Intensive Care Unit every year.

Those babies are among the tiniest and sickest in the Coastal Bend. Often, the babies are transported from surrounding communities to receive NICU treatment at Driscoll.

Some babies will spend weeks in the NICU, some will be there for months. Unfortunately, parents cannot always be there. But a special camera system in the NICU is allowing parents the ability to always see their babies.

UAMS First Hospital in Arkansas to Install Cameras on Every Preemie Bed

UAMS First Hospital in Arkansas to Install Cameras on Every Preemie Bed

The UAMS Medical Center and Angel Eye Camera Systems, a company established in 2013 with support from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS), recently installed 40 new camera systems in the medical center’s neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), making it the first in the state with a camera on every preemie bed.

Using the Angel Eye camera system, parents can see their baby anytime, day or night, from their mobile phone or computer. Angel Eye represents not only the latest technology, but a total rethinking of how to provide patient- and family-centered care for parents and family members who are away from their babies in the NICU.

UNC Children's Hospital now offers families web cams of NICU babies

UNC Children's Hospital now offers families web cams of NICU babies

UNC Children's Hospital just launched a new program called "Family Time" and it allows parents to see their baby on a live video feed around the clock.

Gina Turner couldn't bring her baby boy home this Christmas.

"He was born at 26 weeks gestation, so it was a pretty scary time for us," Turner said.

Turner also has a toddler son, so she can't be with her baby boy Nico all the time.

"I have a 3-year-old son is not able to come to the NICU because of flu season, so they limit the age of children, so he's not even seen his baby brother yet so we can log on at night, read him stories," Turner said.

Inside the NICU: Angel Eye cameras keep families connected to their NICU babies

Inside the NICU: Angel Eye cameras keep families connected to their NICU babies

A small camera is making a big difference to parents of preemies.

One of the hardest parts of having a child in the NICU is trying to balance being with your child with everything else.

NICU parents frequently have to return to work or risk losing their jobs, or they have another child at home. So doctors at UAMS created a way for families to keep their babies with them.

Angel Eye Cameras are in Doylestown Health's VIA Maternity Center

To better accommodate parents with babies in the Intensive Care Nursery (ICN), Doylestown Health's VIA Maternity Center now offers the Angel Eye Camera system, a secure, Internet-based video solution where cameras are placed at the baby's bedside in the ICN, and then a live feed is made available to family and loved ones.

Parents with babies in the ICN will receive their child's camera login information from their care team that can be shared with family and friends. The parents will serve as the central account manager, and can manage their family members' and friends' accounts.

Cameras connect families to NICU babies

Parents of premature newborns in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are often forced to spend time away from their child within their first weeks of life. To ease the anxiety of this separation, particularly around the holidays, the Greenville Health System (GHS) Bryan NICU combines technology and holiday traditions to keep parents engaged with their newborns virtually, using the Angel Eye camera system to provide comfort and security remotely.

During the week of Halloween, NICU staff dress the newborns in costumes to celebrate the holiday. These and other moments can then be viewed by family and friends via the newly available Angel Eye camera system, which is placed at a baby’s bedside and allows parents and family members to see and interact with the baby through live video streaming and direct one-way audio. Parents receive a unique code that can be used to set up a password to their baby’s individual camera, which they can then share with family and friends. The cameras are turned on for families to view the babies except during nursing time and during medical procedures.

Angel Eye Cameras watches over NICU babies at Washington Regional Medical Center

Parents of premature babies who have a long stay in the hospital, usually can't see their child as much as they would like.

At Washington Regional Medical Center, parents can stay with their baby in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit all day, everyday. At some point, parents have to go back to work or take care of other kids.

WRMC has the Angel Eye System that allows parents to watch a live video stream of their baby in the NICU on a phone, tablet or computer. A small camera is attached to each bed in the NICU and parents are given a login for their child's angel camera. This login information can be shared with whoever the parents choose, so family and friends near or far can see the baby, too.

Parents with hospitalized babies can watch them from miles away

Parents with hospitalized babies can watch them from miles away

When first-time parents Kay and Jesse Clark learned their daughter would be born 15 weeks early, they had a decision to make.

“We couldn’t agree on a name,” Jesse said. “We both had our top-choice names picked out, and neither of us would budge.”

The couple didn’t want their baby, who would have to fight for her life, to be born nameless — so they put their heads together, and Kay finally revealed her second pick.